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Int J Qual Health Care. 2018 Jun 1;30(5):358-365. doi: 10.1093/intqhc/mzy024.

Hospitalization from the patient perspective: a data linkage study of adults in Australia.

Author information

1
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Australia.
2
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
Faculty of Health (Deakin), School of Nursing and Midwifery (Melbourne), University of Melbourne & Deakin University, Victoria, Australia.
4
Centre for Team-Based Practice & Learning in Health Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
5
Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.
6
Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeon, Level 13/37 York St, Sydney NSW, Australia.
7
Department of Health Systems and Populations/Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW, Australia.

Abstract

Objective:

Evidence of the patient experience of hospitalization is an essential component of health policy and service improvement but studies often lack a representative population sample or do not examine the influence of patient and hospital characteristics on experiences. We address these gaps by investigating the experiences of a large cohort of recently hospitalized patients aged 45 years and over in New South Wales (NSW), Australia who were identified using data linkage.

Design:

Cross-sectional survey.

Setting:

Hospitals in NSW, Australia.

Participants:

The Picker Patient Experience Survey (PPE-15) was administered to a random sample of 20 000 patients hospitalized between January and June 2014.

Main outcome measure:

Multivariable negative binomial regression was used to investigate factors associated with a higher PPE-15 score.

Results:

There was a 40% response rate (7661 completed surveys received). Respondents often reported a positive experience of being treated with dignity and respect, yet almost 40% wanted to be more involved in decisions about their care. Some respondents identified other problematic aspects of care such as receiving conflicting information from different care providers (18%) and feeling that doctors spoke in front of them as if they were not there (14%). Having an unplanned admission or having an adverse event were both very strongly associated with a poorer patient experience (P < 0.001). No other factors were found to be associated.

Conclusions:

Patient involvement in decision-making about care was highlighted as an important area for improvement. Further work is needed to address the challenges experienced by patients, carers and health professionals in achieving a genuine partnership model.

PMID:
29506029
DOI:
10.1093/intqhc/mzy024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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