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Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2018 Apr;42:37-48. doi: 10.1016/j.pbi.2018.02.003. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Epigenetic perspectives on the evolution and domestication of polyploid plant and crops.

Author information

1
Departments of Molecular Biosciences and Integrative Biology, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, and Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
2
Departments of Molecular Biosciences and Integrative Biology, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, and Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA; State Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China. Electronic address: zjchen@austin.utexas.edu.

Abstract

Polyploidy or whole genome duplication (WGD) is a prominent feature for genome evolution of some animals and all flowering plants, including many important crops such as wheat, cotton, and canola. In autopolyploids, genome duplication often perturbs dosage regulation on biological networks. In allopolyploids, interspecific hybridization could induce genetic and epigenetic changes, the effects of which could be amplified by genome doubling (ploidy changes). Albeit the importance of genetic changes, some epigenetic changes can be stabilized and transmitted as epialleles into the progeny, which are subject to natural selection, adaptation, and domestication. Here we review recent advances for general and specific roles of epigenetic changes in the evolution of flowering plants and domestication of agricultural crops.

PMID:
29502038
PMCID:
PMC6058195
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbi.2018.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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