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Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2018 Jun;95:115-123. doi: 10.1016/j.yrtph.2018.02.017. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

In vitro and in vivo safety studies of cinnamon extract (Cinnamomum cassia) on general and genetic toxicology.

Author information

1
Department of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Experimental Animal Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Neurogenetics, Kolling Institute, Royal North Shore Hospital and University of Sydney, St. Leonards, Australia.
5
Laboratory Animal Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.
6
Biomedical Center for Animal Resource and Development, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: casache@snu.ac.kr.
7
Department of Experimental Animal Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Biomedical Center for Animal Resource and Development, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Graduate School of Translational Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Designed Animal and Transplantation Research Institute, Institute of GreenBio Science Technology, Seoul National University, Pyeongchang-gun, Gangwon-do, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: bckang@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Cinnamomum cassia has been widely used as a natural product to treat diseases in Asia due to its diverse pharmacological functions including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-diabetic, and anti-tumor effects. Despite its ethnomedicinal benefits, little information regarding its toxicity is currently available. The aim of this study was to evaluate its potential long-term toxicity and genotoxicity in compliance with test guidelines of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. A 13-week repeat-dose oral toxicity study revealed that body weights of rats were normal after receiving cinnamon extract at up to 2000 mg/kg. High-dose intake of cinnamon extract (2000 mg/kg) showed potential nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity to both males and females as evidenced by obvious increases of kidney/liver weight along with a small but statistically elevation of total cholesterol level. Overall findings from genetic toxicity testing battery including Ames test, in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus assay, and in vivo bone marrow micronucleus assay indicated that cinnamon extract was not mutagenic or clastogenic. In conclusion, cinnamon extract may possess potential nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity at dose higher than its recommended daily safe dose. Further study is needed to clarify the mechanism involved in its induction of liver and kidney injury.

KEYWORDS:

Cinnamomum cassia; Cinnamon; Genotoxicity; Subchronic; Toxicity

PMID:
29501463
DOI:
10.1016/j.yrtph.2018.02.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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