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Brain Imaging Behav. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1007/s11682-018-9847-7. [Epub ahead of print]

PET imaging of tau protein targets: a methodology perspective.

Author information

1
Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. cloisgomez@mgh.harvard.edu.
2
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

The two neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are amyloid-[Formula: see text] plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein. Fifteen years ago, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh Compound B (11C-PiB) enabled selective in-vivo visualization of amyloid-[Formula: see text] plaque deposits and has since provided valuable information about the role of amyloid-[Formula: see text] deposition in AD. The progression of tau deposition has been shown to be highly associated with neuronal loss, neurodegeneration, and cognitive decline. Until recently it was not possible to visualize tau deposition in-vivo, but several tau PET tracers are now available in different stages of clinical development. To date, no tau tracer has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the evaluation of AD or other tauopathies, despite very active research efforts. In this paper we review the recent developments in tau PET imaging with a focus on in-vivo findings in AD and discuss the challenges associated with tau tracer development, the status of development and validation of different tau tracers, and the clinical information these provide.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Alzheimer’s disease; PET; Radiotracers; Tau Imaging

PMID:
29497982
PMCID:
PMC6119534
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11682-018-9847-7

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