Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Fluency Disord. 2018 Jun;56:33-44. doi: 10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.02.001. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Exogenously triggered response inhibition in developmental stuttering.

Author information

1
Dept. of Speech-Language Therapy, Thomas More University College, Belgium; Experimental Otorinolaryngology, Dept. of Neurosciences, University of Leuven, Belgium; Dept. of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland. Electronic address: kurt.eggers@thomasmore.be.
2
Experimental Otorinolaryngology, Dept. of Neurosciences, University of Leuven, Belgium; Dept. of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: luc.denil@utoronto.ca.
3
Dept. of Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands; Dept. of Psychology, University of Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: bea.vdnbergh@tilburguniversity.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's exogenously triggered response inhibition and stuttering.

METHOD:

Participants were 18 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 9;01 years) and 18 children who not stutter (CWNS; mean age = 9;01 years). Participants were matched on age (±3 months) and gender. Response inhibition was assessed by a stop signal task (Verbruggen, Logan, & Stevens, 2008).

RESULTS:

Results suggest that CWS, compared to CWNS, perform comparable to CWNS in a task where response control is externally triggered.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings seem to indicate that previous questionnaire-based findings (Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) of a decreased efficiency of response inhibition cannot be generalized to all types of response inhibition.

KEYWORDS:

Executive control; Response control; Stuttering; Temperament

PMID:
29494965
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center