Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Mar 1;18(1):146. doi: 10.1186/s12913-018-2961-9.

A systematic review of team-building interventions in non-acute healthcare settings.

Author information

1
Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research (CHOIR), VA Boston Healthcare System (152M), 150 South Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02130, USA. Christopher.Miller8@va.gov.
2
Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, USA. Christopher.Miller8@va.gov.
3
Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research (CHOIR), VA Boston Healthcare System (152M), 150 South Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02130, USA.
4
Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Healthcare is increasingly delivered in a team-based format emphasizing interdisciplinary coordination. While recent reviews have investigated team-building interventions primarily in acute healthcare settings (e.g. emergency or surgery departments), we aimed to systematically review the evidence base for team-building interventions in non-acute settings (e.g. primary care or rehabilitation clinics).

METHODS:

We conducted a systematic review in PubMed and Embase to identify team-building interventions, and conducted follow-up literature searches to identify articles describing empirical studies of those interventions. This process identified 14 team-building interventions for non-acute healthcare settings, and 25 manuscripts describing empirical studies of these interventions. We evaluated outcomes in four domains: trainee evaluations, teamwork attitudes/knowledge, team functioning, and patient impact.

RESULTS:

Trainee evaluations for team-building interventions were generally positive, but only one study associated team-building with statistically significant improvement in teamwork attitudes/knowledge. Similarly mixed results emerged for team functioning and patient impact.

CONCLUSIONS:

The evidence base for healthcare team-building interventions in non-acute healthcare settings is much less developed than the parallel literature for short-term team function in acute care settings. Only one intervention we identified has been tested in multiple non-acute settings by distinct research teams. Positive findings regarding the utility of team-building interventions are tempered by a lack of control conditions, inconsistency in outcome measures, and high probability of bias. Considering these results alongside the well-recognized costs of poor healthcare teamwork suggests that additional research is sorely needed to develop the evidence base for team-building in non-acute settings.

KEYWORDS:

Non-acute; Team training; Team-building intervention; Teamwork

PMID:
29490664
PMCID:
PMC5831839
DOI:
10.1186/s12913-018-2961-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center