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Nature. 2018 Mar 15;555(7696):321-327. doi: 10.1038/nature25480. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

The landscape of genomic alterations across childhood cancers.

Author information

1
Hopp-Children's Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
3
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology & Immunology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.
5
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
The Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
8
Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
9
Division of Applied Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
10
Department of Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology, Heidelberg University and BioQuant Center, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
11
Klinikum Stuttgart - Olgahospital, Zentrum für Kinder-, Jugend- und Frauenmedizin, Pädiatrie, Stuttgart, Germany.
12
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology & Clinical Immunology, University Children's Hospital, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
13
Department of Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
14
Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Pediatrics, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
15
Theodor-Boveri-Institute/Biocenter, Developmental Biochemistry, and Comprehensive Cancer Center Mainfranken, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
16
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Research Laboratories, Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Munich, Germany.
17
Bone Tumor Reference Center at the Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
18
Children's Cancer Research Centre and Department of Pediatrics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
19
Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Aachen, Aachen, Germany.
20
Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
21
Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
22
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Klinikum Kassel, Kassel, Germany.
23
Institute of Human Genetics, University of Ulm & University Hospital of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.
24
Division of Neuroblastoma Genomics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
25
Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
26
Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer Consortium and Department of Clinical Research, Gustave Roussy, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France.
27
Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany.
28
Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
29
Clinical Cooperation Unit Pediatric Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
30
Center for Individualized Pediatric Oncology (ZIPO) and Brain Tumors, University Hospital and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
31
Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
32
Pediatric Oncology & Hematology, Pediatrics III, University Hospital of Essen, Essen, Germany.
33
Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
34
Swabian Children's Cancer Center, Children's Hospital, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany.
35
Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility, High Throughput Sequencing Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
36
Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.
37
University Hospital Cologne, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Cologne, Germany.
38
Department of Oncogenomics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
39
Division of Neurosurgery, Center for Childhood Cancer Research, Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics and Center for Data-Driven Discovery in Biomedicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
40
Department of Computational Biology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
41
Division of Oncology, Center for Childhood Cancer Research, Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics and Center for Data-Driven Discovery in Biomedicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, USA.
42
Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
43
Institute of Computer Science, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
44
Institute of Medical Genetics and Human Genetics, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
45
Bioinformatics and Omics Data Analysis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

Pan-cancer analyses that examine commonalities and differences among various cancer types have emerged as a powerful way to obtain novel insights into cancer biology. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of genetic alterations in a pan-cancer cohort including 961 tumours from children, adolescents, and young adults, comprising 24 distinct molecular types of cancer. Using a standardized workflow, we identified marked differences in terms of mutation frequency and significantly mutated genes in comparison to previously analysed adult cancers. Genetic alterations in 149 putative cancer driver genes separate the tumours into two classes: small mutation and structural/copy-number variant (correlating with germline variants). Structural variants, hyperdiploidy, and chromothripsis are linked to TP53 mutation status and mutational signatures. Our data suggest that 7-8% of the children in this cohort carry an unambiguous predisposing germline variant and that nearly 50% of paediatric neoplasms harbour a potentially druggable event, which is highly relevant for the design of future clinical trials.

PMID:
29489754
DOI:
10.1038/nature25480
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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