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Nature. 2018 Mar 8;555(7695):210-215. doi: 10.1038/nature25973. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Environment dominates over host genetics in shaping human gut microbiota.

Author information

1
Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001, Israel.
2
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001, Israel.
3
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Genetics, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands.
4
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands.
5
Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001, Israel.
6
Internal Medicine Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 6423906, Israel.
7
Research Center for Digestive Tract and Liver Diseases, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6423906, Israel.
8
Day Care Unit and the Laboratory of Imaging and Brain Stimulation, Kfar Shaul Hospital, Jerusalem Center for Mental Health, Jerusalem 9106000, Israel.
9
Digestive Center, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv 6423906, Israel.
10
Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9112001, Israel.
11
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands.
12
Department of Immunology, K.G. Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo, 0424 Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

Human gut microbiome composition is shaped by multiple factors but the relative contribution of host genetics remains elusive. Here we examine genotype and microbiome data from 1,046 healthy individuals with several distinct ancestral origins who share a relatively common environment, and demonstrate that the gut microbiome is not significantly associated with genetic ancestry, and that host genetics have a minor role in determining microbiome composition. We show that, by contrast, there are significant similarities in the compositions of the microbiomes of genetically unrelated individuals who share a household, and that over 20% of the inter-person microbiome variability is associated with factors related to diet, drugs and anthropometric measurements. We further demonstrate that microbiome data significantly improve the prediction accuracy for many human traits, such as glucose and obesity measures, compared to models that use only host genetic and environmental data. These results suggest that microbiome alterations aimed at improving clinical outcomes may be carried out across diverse genetic backgrounds.

PMID:
29489753
DOI:
10.1038/nature25973
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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