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Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2018 Apr;61(4):404-411. doi: 10.1007/s00103-018-2711-5.

[Prevalence of dementia of insured persons with and without German citizenship : A study based on statuatory health insurance data].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Institut für Gesundheitsökonomie und klinische Epidemiologie, Uniklinik Köln (AöR), Gleueler Straße 176-178, 50935, Köln, Deutschland. Stephanie.Stock@uk-koeln.de.
2
PMV Forschungsgruppe, Universität zu Köln, Köln, Deutschland.
3
Institut für Gesundheitsökonomie und klinische Epidemiologie, Uniklinik Köln (AöR), Gleueler Straße 176-178, 50935, Köln, Deutschland.
4
Stabsbereich Politik - Gesundheitsökonomie - Presse, AOK Rheinland/Hamburg, Düsseldorf, Deutschland.
5
Medizinische Psychologie, Neuropsychologie und Gender Studies, Centrum für Neuropsychologische Diagnostik und Intervention (CeNDI), Uniklinik Köln (AöR), Köln, Deutschland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elderly people with a non-German background are a fast growing population in Germany.

OBJECTIVES:

Is administrative prevalence of dementia and uptake of nursing-home care similar in the German and non-German insured?

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Based on routine data, administrative prevalence rates for dementia were calculated for 2013 from a full census of data from one large sickness fund. Patients with dementia (PWD) were identified via ICD-10 codes (F00; F01; F03; F05; G30).

RESULTS:

Administrative prevalence of dementia was 2.67% in the study population; 3.06% in Germans, and 0.96% in non-Germans (p value <0.001). Age and sex adjusted prevalence was comparable in the insured with and without German citizenship, except in women aged 80-84 (17.2 vs. 15.4) and for men in the age groups 80-84 (16.5 vs. 14.2), 85-89 years (23.4 vs. 21.5), and above 90 years of age (32.3 vs. 26.3). Standardized to the population of all investigated insured, 31.4% of all Germans with dementia had no longterm care entitlement vs. 35.5% of all patients without German citizenship. Of German patients, 55.1% were institutionalized vs. 39.5% of all patients without German citizenship.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was a higher prevalence of dementia in the very old insured without German citizenship compared to those with German citizenship, especially in men. Non-Germans showed lower uptake of nursing home care compared to Germans. Additionally, Germans had slightly higher nursing care entitlements. It should be investigated further how much of the difference is due to underdiagnosis, cultural differences, or lack of adequate diagnostic work-up.

KEYWORDS:

Administrative prevalence; Dementia; Germany; Migrants; Statutory health insurance

PMID:
29487974
DOI:
10.1007/s00103-018-2711-5

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