Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 27;8(1):3742. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-22137-8.

Trial by trial dependencies in multisensory perception and their correlates in dynamic brain activity.

Author information

1
Department for Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University, Universitätsstr. 25, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany. Stephanie.Kayser@uni-bielefeld.de.
2
Cognitive Interaction Technology - Center of Excellence, Bielefeld University, Inspiration 1, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany. Stephanie.Kayser@uni-bielefeld.de.
3
Department for Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University, Universitätsstr. 25, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany.
4
Cognitive Interaction Technology - Center of Excellence, Bielefeld University, Inspiration 1, 33615, Bielefeld, Germany.
5
Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

Abstract

A well-known effect in multisensory perception is that congruent information received by different senses usually leads to faster and more accurate responses. Less well understood are trial-by-trial interactions, whereby the multisensory composition of stimuli experienced during previous trials shapes performance during a subsequent trial. We here exploit the analogy of multisensory paradigms with classical flanker tasks to investigate the neural correlates underlying trial-by-trial interactions of multisensory congruency. Studying an audio-visual motion task, we demonstrate that congruency benefits for accuracy and reaction times are reduced following an audio-visual incongruent compared to a congruent preceding trial. Using single trial analysis of motion-sensitive EEG components we then localize current-trial and serial interaction effects within distinct brain regions: while the multisensory congruency experienced during the current trial influences the encoding of task-relevant information in sensory-specific brain regions, the serial interaction arises from task-relevant processes within the inferior frontal lobe. These results highlight parallels between multisensory paradigms and classical flanker tasks and demonstrate a role of amodal association cortices in shaping perception based on the history of multisensory congruency.

PMID:
29487374
PMCID:
PMC5829215
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-22137-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center