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BMC Public Health. 2018 Feb 27;18(1):296. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5182-6.

Evaluation of the effectiveness of a WHO-5A model based comprehensive tobacco control program among migrant workers in Guangdong, China: a pilot study.

Chai W1,2, Zou G2,3, Shi J2, Chen W1,2, Gong X1,2, Wei X4, Ling L5,6.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.
2
Sun Yat-sen Center for Migrant Health Policy, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.
3
Institute for Global Health and Development, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK.
4
Division of Clinical Public Health and Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
5
Faculty of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. lingli@mail.sysu.edu.cn.
6
Sun Yat-sen Center for Migrant Health Policy, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. lingli@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

As a vulnerable population in China, migrant workers have a higher smoking rate than the general population. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a WHO-5A based comprehensive tobacco control program in workplaces aggregated with migrants.

METHODS:

Using a controlled before and after design, four purposely selected manufacturing factories were assigned to either intervention or control groups. Participants in the intervention arm received adapted 5A group counseling regularly supported by social-media and traditional health education approaches. The primary outcome was the change of smoking rate based on salivary cotinine concentration at three-month follow-up as compared to the control arm. Secondary outcomes were changes in smoking-related knowledge and attitudes assessed using questionnaires. Difference-in-differences approach (DID) and generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were used to conduct the effectiveness analysis.

RESULTS:

149 and 166 workers were enrolled in the intervention and control arm respectively. The multiple imputed and adjusted GEE models demonstrated that, compared to those in the control arm, participants in the intervention arm had nearly 2.4 times odds of improving smoking-related knowledge (OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.32-4.36, P = 0.02) and three times the odds of improving smoking-related attitude (OR = 3.07, 95% CI = 1.28-7.41, P = 0.03). However, no significant difference was found regarding the change of smoking rate between the two arms (P > 0.05). The regression analysis showed that attendance at the 5A group counseling sections was an important determinant of stopping smoking or improving smoking-related knowledge and attitudes in the intervention group.

CONCLUSIONS:

This WHO-5A comprehensive intervention was effective in improving migrant workers' knowledge of smoking and anti-smoking attitudes. A large-scale, long-term trial is recommended to determine the effectiveness of this intervention.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ChiCTR-OPC-17011637 at Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. Retrospectively registered on 12th June 2017.

KEYWORDS:

Cotinine; Intervention programs; Migrant; Tobacco control; Workplace

PMID:
29486753
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-018-5182-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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