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Dev Cell. 2018 Feb 26;44(4):460-470.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2018.01.026.

Fat Body Cells Are Motile and Actively Migrate to Wounds to Drive Repair and Prevent Infection.

Author information

1
School of Biochemistry, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK.
2
School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK. Electronic address: w.wood@ed.ac.uk.
3
School of Biochemistry, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK; School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK; School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. Electronic address: paul.martin@bristol.ac.uk.

Abstract

Adipocytes have many functions in various tissues beyond energy storage, including regulating metabolism, growth, and immunity. However, little is known about their role in wound healing. Here we use live imaging of fat body cells, the equivalent of vertebrate adipocytes in Drosophila, to investigate their potential behaviors and functions following skin wounding. We find that pupal fat body cells are not immotile, as previously presumed, but actively migrate to wounds using an unusual adhesion-independent, actomyosin-driven, peristaltic mode of motility. Once at the wound, fat body cells collaborate with hemocytes, Drosophila macrophages, to clear the wound of cell debris; they also tightly seal the epithelial wound gap and locally release antimicrobial peptides to fight wound infection. Thus, fat body cells are motile cells, enabling them to migrate to wounds to undertake several local functions needed to drive wound repair and prevent infections.

KEYWORDS:

Drosophila; adipocytes; antimicrobial peptides (AMPs); cell migration; fat body; hemocytes; inflammatory response; wound healing; wound infection

Comment in

PMID:
29486196
PMCID:
PMC6113741
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2018.01.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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