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Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 26;8(1):3585. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-21911-y.

Human Epicardial Adipose Tissue cTGF Expression is an Independent Risk Factor for Atrial Fibrillation and Highly Associated with Atrial Fibrosis.

Author information

1
Center for Comprehensive Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
2
Center for Comprehensive Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. zhyf19810824@163.com.
3
Center for Comprehensive Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. wangzn007@163.com.

Abstract

Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is associated with the incidence, perpetuation, and recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), with elusive underlying mechanisms. We analyzed adipokine expression in samples from 20 patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and 16 with AF. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that connective tissue growth factor (cTGF) expression was significantly higher in EAT than in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) or paracardial adipose tissue (PAT) from patients with AF, and in EAT from patients with SR (P < 0.001). Galectin-3 expression was significantly higher in EAT than in SAT or PAT (P < 0.001), with no significant differences between patients with AF and SR (P > 0.05). Leptin and vaspin expression were lower in EAT than in PAT (P < 0.001). Trichrome staining showed that the fibrosis was much more severe in patients with AF than SR (P < 0.001). We found a linear relationship between cTGF mRNA expression level and collagen volume fraction (y = 1.471x + 27.330, P < 0.001), and logistic regression showed that cTGF level was an independent risk factor for AF (OR 2.369, P = 0.027). In conclusion, highly expressed in EAT, cTGF is associated with atrial fibrosis, and can be an important risk factor for AF.

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