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Psychiatry Res. 2018 May;263:30-34. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.02.036. Epub 2018 Feb 17.

No major influence of regular tobacco smoking on cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolite concentrations in patients with psychotic disorder and healthy individuals.

Author information

1
Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
3
Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: erik.jonsson@ki.se.

Abstract

Metabolism of the monoamines dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline, is altered in the central nervous system of people with schizophrenia, and their major metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), respectively, have been intensively studied as indirect measures of these neurotransmitters in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Regular tobacco smoking has been shown to alter neurotransmitter metabolism in the brain and studies have found CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations to be substantially lower in smokers. However, few studies investigating these monoamines in CSF have controlled for regular tobacco smoking. We investigated if regular tobacco smoking influences CSF HVA, 5-HIAA and MHPG concentrations in patients treated for psychotic disorders (n = 69) and healthy non-psychotic human volunteers (n = 200). After lumbar puncture CSF samples were analyzed with mass fragmentography. CSF HVA, 5-HIAA and MHPG concentrations did not significantly differ between smokers and non-smokers neither in patients, nor in healthy subjects, whereas back-length predicted HVA and 5-HIAA and antipsychotic medication MHPG concentrations. The results indicate that regular tobacco smoking has no significant effect on monoamine metabolite concentrations in CSF. This suggests that lack of controlling for regular tobacco smoking should not substantially violate the results in studies of the major monoamine metabolites in CSF.

KEYWORDS:

5-HIAA; Cerebrospinal fluid; HVA; MHPG; Monoamine metabolites; Tobacco

PMID:
29482043
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2018.02.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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