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Nat Med. 2018 May;24(4):484-490. doi: 10.1038/nm.4502. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

Restorative effects of human neural stem cell grafts on the primate spinal cord.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
2
Veterans Administration Medical Center, La Jolla, California, USA.
3
California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
4
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
5
Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.
7
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.
8
Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

We grafted human spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) into sites of cervical spinal cord injury in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Under three-drug immunosuppression, grafts survived at least 9 months postinjury and expressed both neuronal and glial markers. Monkey axons regenerated into grafts and formed synapses. Hundreds of thousands of human axons extended out from grafts through monkey white matter and synapsed in distal gray matter. Grafts gradually matured over 9 months and improved forelimb function beginning several months after grafting. These findings in a 'preclinical trial' support translation of NPC graft therapy to humans with the objective of reconstituting both a neuronal and glial milieu in the site of spinal cord injury.

PMID:
29480894
PMCID:
PMC5922761
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4502
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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