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Bipolar Disord. 2018 Nov;20(7):658-665. doi: 10.1111/bdi.12633. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

Cardiometabolic risks and omega-3 index in recent-onset bipolar I disorder.

Author information

1
Division of Bipolar Disorders Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aims of the present study were to characterize cardiometabolic risk factors in a cohort of bipolar disorder patients with limited exposure to psychotropic medications, and to evaluate their associations with mood symptoms and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) blood levels.

METHODS:

Cardiometabolic risk assessments were compared in individuals with bipolar I disorder experiencing a first manic or mixed episode or an early depressive episode (n=117) and healthy subjects (n=56). Patients were medication free at assessment and had no or limited exposure to mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications prior to the current admission. Associations among cardiometabolic parameters and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale (CGI-S), manic (Young Mania Rating Scale [YMRS]), and depressive (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS]) symptom ratings were evaluated within the bipolar group.

RESULTS:

Following adjustment for demographic variables (i.e., age, gender, and parental education), significantly higher fasting triglyceride levels were observed in the bipolar group compared to the healthy group (121.7 mg/dL vs 87.0 mg/dL; P<.01). There were no clear trends for other metabolic indicators, including blood pressure, body mass index, and fasting glucose. Nineteen percent of the bipolar group and 6% of the healthy group met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (P=.23). The omega-3 index was lower in the bipolar group (3.4% vs 3.9%; P<.01). Within the bipolar group, no associations were found between the cardiometabolic parameters and CGI-S, YMRS, and HDRS symptom ratings.

CONCLUSIONS:

Recent-onset medication-free bipolar disorder is associated with higher triglyceride levels. These findings are suggestive of early metabolic dysregulation prior to long-term psychotropic medication exposure. Lower omega-3 PUFA levels in individuals with bipolar I disorder represent a potential therapeutic target for additional investigation.

KEYWORDS:

bipolar disorder; glucose; metabolic syndrome; omega-3 fatty acids; triglycerides

PMID:
29479787
DOI:
10.1111/bdi.12633

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