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J Nephrol. 2018 Jun;31(3):361-383. doi: 10.1007/s40620-018-0477-3. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Immunosuppression in pregnant women with renal disease: review of the latest evidence in the biologics era.

Author information

1
Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplant Division, Department of Medical Sciences, "Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino" University Hospital, Università degli Studi di Torino, Corso Dogliotti 14, 10126, Turin, Italy.
2
Obstetrics and Gynecology 1, Department of Surgical Sciences, Sant'Anna University Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
3
Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplant Division, Department of Medical Sciences, "Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino" University Hospital, Università degli Studi di Torino, Corso Dogliotti 14, 10126, Turin, Italy. luigi.biancone@unito.it.

Abstract

Care of pregnant woman, including fertility and procreation counseling, has become a significant part of the nephrological practice in the last years. In this context, the management of immunosuppression assumes a primary role both for autoimmune diseases and for post-transplant follow up. The present review analyzes the latest evidence on immunosuppressive drugs of current use in nephrology and kidney transplantation. Although the placenta inactivates prednisone and prednisolone, it is advisable to limit the dose to the minimal effective one, to prevent side effects. Azathioprine is generally the immunosuppressive of choice in many high-risk pregnancies in autoimmune diseases because of the safety profile and its steroid-sparing property. In lupus nephropathy, hydroxychloroquine is a current indication in the prevention of flares. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus can also be used as steroid-sparing agents as well as in post-transplant maintenance therapy. Experience on mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors is limited and its use during pregnancy is still controversial even if initial positive data are emerging. Intravenous immunoglobulins are safe and represent an important option for relapses of lupus and vasculitis. Mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide are to avoid. An important part is reserved to biologic agents, which are having a huge impact on therapy protocols for several pathologies. Data on the utilization of these molecules during pregnancy, however, are still scant and therefore they do not yet allow a definitive evaluation of their safety profile.

KEYWORDS:

Antibodies; Glomerulonephritis; Immunosuppression; Kidney transplantation; Monoclonal; Pregnancy

PMID:
29476421
DOI:
10.1007/s40620-018-0477-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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