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Nat Commun. 2018 Feb 23;9(1):803. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03184-1.

Correlating chemical diversity with taxonomic distance for discovery of natural products in myxobacteria.

Author information

1
Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), Department of Microbial Natural Products, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Saarland University, Campus E8.1, 66123, Saarbrücken, Germany.
2
German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Hannover-Braunschweig, 38124, Braunschweig, Germany.
3
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Department of Microbial Drugs, 38124, Braunschweig, Germany.
4
Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), Department of Microbial Natural Products, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Saarland University, Campus E8.1, 66123, Saarbrücken, Germany. rolf.mueller@helmholtz-hzi.de.
5
German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Hannover-Braunschweig, 38124, Braunschweig, Germany. rolf.mueller@helmholtz-hzi.de.

Abstract

Some bacterial clades are important sources of novel bioactive natural products. Estimating the magnitude of chemical diversity available from such a resource is complicated by issues including cultivability, isolation bias and limited analytical data sets. Here we perform a systematic metabolite survey of ~2300 bacterial strains of the order Myxococcales, a well-established source of natural products, using mass spectrometry. Our analysis encompasses both known and previously unidentified metabolites detected under laboratory cultivation conditions, thereby enabling large-scale comparison of production profiles in relation to myxobacterial taxonomy. We find a correlation between taxonomic distance and the production of distinct secondary metabolite families, further supporting the idea that the chances of discovering novel metabolites are greater by examining strains from new genera rather than additional representatives within the same genus. In addition, we report the discovery and structure elucidation of rowithocin, a myxobacterial secondary metabolite featuring an uncommon phosphorylated polyketide scaffold.

PMID:
29476047
PMCID:
PMC5824889
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-03184-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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