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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Mar 6;115(10):E2220-E2228. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1714582115. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Porin self-association enables cell-to-cell contact in Providencia stuartii floating communities.

Author information

1
Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS), University of Grenoble Alpes (UGA), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA), 38000 Grenoble, France.
2
Life Sciences & Chemistry, Jacobs University, 28759 Bremen, Germany.
3
UMR MD1, Aix-Marseille University, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Marseille, F-13385 Marseille, France.
4
Laboratories of Excellence, Ion Channel Science and Therapeutics, 06560 Valbonne, France.
5
Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS), University of Grenoble Alpes (UGA), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA), 38000 Grenoble, France; colletier@ibs.fr.

Abstract

The gram-negative pathogen Providencia stuartii forms floating communities within which adjacent cells are in apparent contact, before depositing as canonical surface-attached biofilms. Because porins are the most abundant proteins in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, we hypothesized that they could be involved in cell-to-cell contact and undertook a structure-function relationship study on the two porins of P. stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2. Our crystal structures reveal that these porins can self-associate through their extracellular loops, forming dimers of trimers (DOTs) that could enable cell-to-cell contact within floating communities. Support for this hypothesis was obtained by studying the porin-dependent aggregation of liposomes and model cells. The observation that facing channels are open in the two porin structures suggests that DOTs could not only promote cell-to-cell contact but also contribute to intercellular communication.

KEYWORDS:

biofilms; cell adhesion; intercellular communication; porins; steric zippers

PMID:
29476011
PMCID:
PMC5878009
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1714582115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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