Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Jul 15;630:53-61. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.183. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Assessment of heavy metal pollution and human health risks in urban soils around an electronics manufacturing facility.

Author information

1
School of Laboratory Medicine, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, 1 Huangjia Lake West Road, Wuhan 430065, China. Electronic address: wuwei@hbtcm.edu.cn.
2
School of Laboratory Medicine, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, 1 Huangjia Lake West Road, Wuhan 430065, China.
3
MOE Key Laboratory of Environment & Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Abstract

Heavy metal pollution has pervaded many parts of the world, especially in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations and health risks of heavy metals in urban soils around an electronics manufacturing site in the Hubei Province of China. Soils samples were collected from commercial, roadside, farmland, and residential areas around the electronics manufacturing facility. A total of 136 topsoil samples were collected, and these samples were analyzed for Cr, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, and Pb. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo), pollution index (PI), and potential ecological risk index (PER) were calculated to assess the soil pollution levels. The hazard index (HI) was used to assess the human health risks posed by the presence of heavy metals. The total concentrations of the seven congeners (∑metals) ranged from 3738.86 to 5173.25mgkg-1, and the concentrations were highest in the commercial area followed (in decreasing order) by the roadside, farmland, and residential areas. The HI for children and adults descended in the order of Cr>As>Pb>Cd>Cu>Ni>Zn. The carcinogenic risks of two metals, namely, Cr and As, for children and adults were higher than 10-4, and children faced greater health risks.

KEYWORDS:

Electronics manufacturing facility; Health risk; Heavy metal pollution; Pollution index

PMID:
29475113
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.183
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center