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Atten Percept Psychophys. 2018 May;80(4):894-912. doi: 10.3758/s13414-018-1485-z.

Speaker information affects false recognition of unstudied lexical-semantic associates.

Author information

1
Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences, Brown University, 190 Thayer St., Box 1821, Providence, RI, 02912, USA. sahil.luthra@uconn.edu.
2
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Rd, Unit 1020, Storrs, CT, 06269, USA. sahil.luthra@uconn.edu.
3
Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences, Brown University, 190 Thayer St., Box 1821, Providence, RI, 02912, USA.
4
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, 675 Nelson Rising Lane, Room 535, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.
5
Brown Institute for Brain Science, Brown University, 2 Stimson Ave, Providence, RI, 02912, USA.

Abstract

Recognition of and memory for a spoken word can be facilitated by a prior presentation of that word spoken by the same talker. However, it is less clear whether this speaker congruency advantage generalizes to facilitate recognition of unheard related words. The present investigation employed a false memory paradigm to examine whether information about a speaker's identity in items heard by listeners could influence the recognition of novel items (critical intruders) phonologically or semantically related to the studied items. In Experiment 1, false recognition of semantically associated critical intruders was sensitive to speaker information, though only when subjects attended to talker identity during encoding. Results from Experiment 2 also provide some evidence that talker information affects the false recognition of critical intruders. Taken together, the present findings indicate that indexical information is able to contact the lexical-semantic network to affect the processing of unheard words.

KEYWORDS:

Attention and memory; Phonology and semantics; Spoken word recognition

PMID:
29473144
PMCID:
PMC6003774
DOI:
10.3758/s13414-018-1485-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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