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Lasers Med Sci. 2018 Aug;33(6):1245-1254. doi: 10.1007/s10103-018-2465-1. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

The effects of exercise training associated with low-level laser therapy on biomarkers of adipose tissue transdifferentiation in obese women.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, Therapeutic Resources Laboratory, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), Rodovia Washington Luis, Km 235, São Carlos, São Paulo, 13565-905, Brazil. raquelmunhoz@hotmail.com.
2
Post Graduated Program of Nutrition Paulista Medicine School, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Rua Marselhesa, 650-Vila Clementino, São Paulo, SP, 04020-050, Brazil. ana.damaso@unifesp.br.
3
São Camilo University Center, São Paulo, Brazil.
4
Electrical Engineering Department, Engineering School of São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Av. Trabalhador Sãocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13566-590, Brazil.
5
São Carlos Institute of Physics, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), PO Box 369, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970, Brazil.
6
Centro de Traumato-Ortopedia do Esporte (CETE), Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
7
Laboratório Interdisciplinar em Fisiologia e Exercício (LAIFE), São Paulo, Brazil.
8
Post Graduated Program of Nutrition Paulista Medicine School, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Rua Marselhesa, 650-Vila Clementino, São Paulo, SP, 04020-050, Brazil.
9
Weight Science, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
10
Department of Physiology Paulista Medicine School, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
11
Post Graduated Program of Biotechnology, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, SP, 13565-905, Brazil.
12
Department of Physiotherapy, Therapeutic Resources Laboratory, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), Rodovia Washington Luis, Km 235, São Carlos, São Paulo, 13565-905, Brazil. nivaldoaparizotto@hotmail.com.
13
Post Graduated Program of Biotechnology, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, SP, 13565-905, Brazil. nivaldoaparizotto@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Investigations suggest the benefits of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to improve noninvasive body contouring treatments, inflammation, insulin resistance and to reduce body fat. However, the mechanism for such potential effects in association with exercise training (ET) and possible implications in browning adiposity processes remains unclear. Forty-nine obese women were involved, aged between 20 and 40 years with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-40 kg/m2. The volunteers were divided into Phototherapy (808 nm) and SHAM groups. Interventions consisted of exercise training and phototherapy applications post exercise for 4 months, with three sessions/week. Body composition, lipid profile, insulin resistance, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), WNT5 signaling, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) were measured. Improvements in body mass, BMI, body fat mass, lean mass, visceral fat, waist circumference, insulin, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and ANP in both groups were demonstrated. Only the Phototherapy group showed a reduction in interleukin-6 and an increase in WNT5 signaling. In addition, it was possible to observe a higher magnitude change for the fat mass, insulin, HOMA-IR, and FGF-21 variables in the Phototherapy group. In the present investigation, it was demonstrated that exercise training associated with LLLT promotes an improvement in body composition and inflammatory processes as previously demonstrated. The Phototherapy group especially presented positive modifications of WNT5 signaling, FGF-21, and ANP, possible biomarkers associated with browning adiposity processes. This suggests that this kind of intervention promotes results applicable in clinical practice to control obesity and related comorbidities.

KEYWORDS:

Adipose tissue; Browning; Obesity; Phototherapy; Physical exercise

PMID:
29473115
DOI:
10.1007/s10103-018-2465-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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