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Eur J Nutr. 2019 Apr;58(3):1159-1172. doi: 10.1007/s00394-018-1631-3. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Flavonoid intake from fruit and vegetables during adolescence is prospectively associated with a favourable risk factor profile for type 2 diabetes in early adulthood.

Author information

1
DONALD Study Dortmund, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences (IEL), Nutritional Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Heinstück 11, 44225, Dortmund, Germany.
2
Institute of Nutrition, Consumption and Health, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Paderborn, Warburger Straße 100, 33098, Paderborn, Germany.
3
Institute for Clinical Diabetology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Auf'm Hennekamp 65, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany.
4
German Center for Diabetes Research, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764, München-Neuherberg, Germany.
5
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences (IEL), Nutritional Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Endenicher Allee 11-13, 53115, Bonn, Germany.
6
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences (IEL), Nutritional Physiology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 9, 53115, Bonn, Germany.
7
Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology, Laboratory for Translational Hormone Analytics, Peptide Hormone Research Unit, Center of Child and Adolescent Medicine, Justus Liebig University, Feulgenstrasse 12, 35392, Gießen, Germany.
8
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany.
9
DONALD Study Dortmund, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences (IEL), Nutritional Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Heinstück 11, 44225, Dortmund, Germany. anette.buyken@uni-paderborn.de.
10
Institute of Nutrition, Consumption and Health, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Paderborn, Warburger Straße 100, 33098, Paderborn, Germany. anette.buyken@uni-paderborn.de.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Flavonoid consumption during adolescence could contribute to preventing adult onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated the prospective association between habitual intake of flavonoids from fruit and vegetables (FlavFV) during adolescence and risk markers of type 2 diabetes in early adulthood.

METHODS:

This analysis included participants of the DONALD Study, who had provided a fasting blood sample in adulthood (18-39 years), data on FlavFV-intake during adolescence (females: 9-15 years, males: 10-16 years) and relevant covariates. Habitual FlavFV-intake was either estimated using repeated 3-day weighed dietary records (n = 268), or the validated biomarker hippuric acid (uHA)-excretion in repeated 24-h urine samples (n = 241). Multivariable linear regressions were performed to analyse the prospective associations of FlavFV or uHA with homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-%S), hepatic steatosis index (HSI), fatty liver index (FLI) and a pro-inflammatory score.

RESULTS:

Higher FlavFV-intake was independently related to higher HOMA2-%S among females (Ptrend = 0.03), but not among males. Both FlavFV-intake and uHA-excretion were inversely associated with HSI (Ptrend < 0.0001 and Ptrend = 0.02, respectively) and the pro-inflammatory score (Ptrend = 0.02 and Ptrend = 0.008, respectively), but not with FLI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data indicate that flavonoid consumption from fruit and vegetables during adolescence is associated with a favourable risk factor profile for type 2 diabetes in early adulthood.

KEYWORDS:

24-Hour urinary hippuric acid excretion; Chronic subclinical inflammation; Flavonoids from fruit and vegetables; Homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity; Indices of hepatic steatosis; Prospective

PMID:
29468461
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-018-1631-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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