Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Behav Genet. 2018 Mar;48(2):155-167. doi: 10.1007/s10519-018-9890-6. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. faliev@vcu.edu.
2
Department of Actuarial and Risk Management, Karabuk University, Karabuk, Turkey. faliev@vcu.edu.
3
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. jesalvatore@vcu.edu.
4
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. jesalvatore@vcu.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
6
Department of Genetics, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA.
8
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
9
Division of Child Psychiatry, University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City, IA, USA.
10
Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
11
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
12
Department of Human & Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Abstract

The Trait-based test that uses the Extended Simes procedure (TATES) was developed as a method for conducting multivariate GWAS for correlated phenotypes whose underlying genetic architecture is complex. In this paper, we provide a brief methodological critique of the TATES method using simulated examples and a mathematical proof. Our simulated examples using correlated phenotypes show that the Type I error rate is higher than expected, and that more TATES p values fall outside of the confidence interval relative to expectation. Thus the method may result in systematic inflation when used with correlated phenotypes. In a mathematical proof we further demonstrate that the distribution of TATES p values deviates from expectation in a manner indicative of inflation. Our findings indicate the need for caution when using TATES for multivariate GWAS of correlated phenotypes.

KEYWORDS:

Complex traits; Multivariate GWAS; TATES

PMID:
29468442
PMCID:
PMC6028780
DOI:
10.1007/s10519-018-9890-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center