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Sci Rep. 2018 Feb 21;8(1):3393. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-21771-6.

Trend and risk factors of low birth weight and macrosomia in south China, 2005-2017: a retrospective observational study.

Rao J1,2, Fan D3,4, Wu S1,2, Lin D1,2, Zhang H1,2, Ye S1,2, Luo X1,2, Wang L2, Yang J5, Pang M5, Zhang J5, Xia Q6,7, Yang X6,8, Wang W2, Fu Y2, Liu Y2, Guo X1,2, Liu Z9,10.

Author information

1
Foshan Institute of Fetal Medicine, Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, 528000, China.
2
Department of Obstetrics, Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, 528000, China.
3
Foshan Institute of Fetal Medicine, Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, 528000, China. fandazhigw@163.com.
4
Department of Obstetrics, Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, 528000, China. fandazhigw@163.com.
5
Department of Epidemiology, School of Basic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510632, China.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032, China.
7
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 23, Hobart, Tasmania, 7000, Australia.
8
Department of Rheumatism and Immunity, the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230000, China.
9
Foshan Institute of Fetal Medicine, Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, 528000, China. liuzphlk81@outlook.com.
10
Department of Obstetrics, Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, 528000, China. liuzphlk81@outlook.com.

Abstract

The percentages of low birth weight (LBW) increased from 7.7% in 2005 to 11.3% in 2011 and declined to 8.1% in 2017. For very low birth weight (VLBW) individuals, the proportion declined -1.0% annually, from 2.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2017. Among moderately low birth weight (MLBW) individuals, the proportion first increased 12.8% annually, from 5.0% in 2005 to 9.3% in 2011, and then declined -3.8% annually, from 9.4% in 2011 to 7.0% in 2017. The percentages of macrosomia monotone decreased from 4.0% in 2005 to 2.5% in 2017, an annual decline of -4.0%. Multiple regression analyses showed that boys, maternal age, hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy (HDCP), and diabetes were significant risk factors for LBW. Boys, maternal age, gestational age, HDCP, diabetes, and maternal BMI were significant risk factors for macrosomia. Although the relevant figures declined slightly in our study, it is likely that LBW and macrosomia will remain a major public health issue over the next few years in China. More research aimed at control and prevention of these risk factors for LBW and macrosomia and their detrimental outcome in the mother and perinatal child should be performed in China.

PMID:
29467433
PMCID:
PMC5821827
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-21771-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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