Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2018 Feb 21;9(1):738. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03199-8.

Long-distance propagation of short-wavelength spin waves.

Author information

1
Fert Beijing Research Institute, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, BDBC, Beihang University, 100191, Beijing, China.
2
State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, School of Physics, Peking University, 100871, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523, USA.
4
Fert Beijing Research Institute, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, BDBC, Beihang University, 100191, Beijing, China. haiming.yu@buaa.edu.cn.
5
Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016, Nanjing, China.
6
Department of Physics, Southern University of Science and Technology, 518055, Shenzhen, China.
7
Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, 100875, Beijing, China.
8
Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523, USA. mwu@colostate.edu.

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed a rapidly growing interest in exploring the use of spin waves for information transmission and computation toward establishing a spin-wave-based technology that is not only significantly more energy efficient than the CMOS technology, but may also cause a major departure from the von-Neumann architecture by enabling memory-in-logic and logic-in-memory architectures. A major bottleneck of advancing this technology is the excitation of spin waves with short wavelengths, which is a must because the wavelength dictates device scalability. Here, we report the discovery of an approach for the excitation of nm-wavelength spin waves. The demonstration uses ferromagnetic nanowires grown on a 20-nm-thick Y3Fe5O12 film strip. The propagation of spin waves with a wavelength down to 50 nm over a distance of 60,000 nm is measured. The measurements yield a spin-wave group velocity as high as 2600 m s-1, which is faster than both domain wall and skyrmion motions.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center