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Nutrients. 2018 Feb 16;10(2). pii: E224. doi: 10.3390/nu10020224.

Achieving Optimal Post-Exercise Muscle Protein Remodeling in Physically Active Adults through Whole Food Consumption.

Author information

1
Center for Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. svanvliet@wustl.edu.
2
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 USA. jbeals2@illinois.edu.
3
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. igm2@illinois.edu.
4
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. sarahks2@illinois.edu.
5
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 USA. naburd@illinois.edu.
6
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. naburd@illinois.edu.

Abstract

Dietary protein ingestion is critical to maintaining the quality and quantity of skeletal muscle mass throughout adult life. The performance of acute exercise enhances muscle protein remodeling by stimulating protein synthesis rates for several hours after each bout, which can be optimized by consuming protein during the post-exercise recovery period. To date, the majority of the evidence regarding protein intake to optimize post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates is limited to isolated protein sources. However, it is more common to ingest whole food sources of protein within a normal eating pattern. Emerging evidence demonstrates a promising role for the ingestion of whole foods as an effective nutritional strategy to support muscle protein remodeling and recovery after exercise. This review aims to evaluate the efficacy of the ingestion of nutrient-rich and protein-dense whole foods to support post-exercise muscle protein remodeling and recovery with pertinence towards physically active people.

KEYWORDS:

amino acids; athletic performance; endurance exercise; muscle protein synthesis; resistance exercise

PMID:
29462924
PMCID:
PMC5852800
DOI:
10.3390/nu10020224
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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