Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Surg. 2018 Aug;268(2):204-211. doi: 10.1097/SLA.0000000000002700.

Gender Differences in Utilization of Duty-hour Regulations, Aspects of Burnout, and Psychological Well-being Among General Surgery Residents in the United States.

Author information

1
Surgical Outcomes and Quality Improvement Center (SOQIC), Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.
2
Center for Healthcare Studies in the Institute for Public Health and Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.
3
Wisconsin Surgical Outcomes Research (WiSOR) Program, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.
4
Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA.
5
Department of Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.
6
American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to (1) assess differences in how male and female general surgery residents utilize duty-hour regulations and experience aspects of burnout and psychological well-being, and (2) to explore reasons why these differing experiences exist.

BACKGROUND:

There may be differences in how women and men enter, experience, and leave residency programs.

METHODS:

A total of 7395 residents completed a survey (response rate = 99%). Logistic regression models were developed to examine the association between gender and resident outcomes. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 42 faculty and 56 residents. Transcripts were analyzed thematically using a constant comparative approach.

RESULTS:

Female residents reported more frequently staying in the hospital >28 hours or working >80 hours in a week (≥3 times in a month, P < 0.001) and more frequently feeling fatigued and burned out from their work (P < 0.001), but less frequently "treating patients as impersonal objects" or "not caring what happens" to them (P < 0.001). Women reported more often having experienced many aspects of poor psychological well-being such as feeling unhappy and depressed or thinking of themselves as worthless (P < 0.01). In adjusted analyses, associations remained significant. Themes identified in the qualitative analysis as possible contributory factors to gender differences include a lack of female mentorship/leadership, dual-role responsibilities, gender blindness, and differing pressures and approaches to patient care.

CONCLUSIONS:

Female residents report working more, experiencing certain aspects of burnout more frequently, and having poorer psychological well-being. Qualitative themes provide insights into possible cultural and programmatic shifts to address the concerns for female residents.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center