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J Strength Cond Res. 2018 Feb 14. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002514. [Epub ahead of print]

The Effect of Augmented Feedback Type and Frequency on Velocity-Based Training-Induced Adaptation and Retention.

Author information

1
Faculty of Sports Science, Chukyo University, Aichi, Japan.
2
College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.
3
Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Faculty of Sports Science, Ryukoku University, Kyoto, Japan.
5
Faculty of Information Science and Electrical Engineering Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the benefits of 4-weeks of velocity-based training (VBT) using different augmented feedback (AugFb) types and the frequency of AugFb, and whether adaptations are retained 10 days post-training. Thirty-seven collegiate male rugby players were divided into groups that received immediate-feedback (ImFb; n=9), visual-feedback (ViFb; n=10), average-feedback (AvgFb; n=10) and no-feedback (NoFb; n=8) during each VBT session consisting of 3 sets of 5 repetitions of loaded jump squats. The ImFb group received AugFb regarding lifting velocity under loaded jump squats (LV-JS) following every jump, whereas LV-JS measures were averaged following each set of jumps and presented to the AvgFb group. The loaded jump squats were video-recorded and displayed as kinematic feedback for the ViFb group following each set, although no feedback was provided for the NoFb group. LV-JS measures were reported at baseline, during each training session and 10-days post training. LV-JS measures were significantly greater for the ImFb Group compared to the other groups during a number of post-baseline time points (P<0.05). Furthermore, at 4-weeks of VBT and 10 days post-retention, effect size (ES) calculations showed that LV-JS measures were greater with moderate to large effects for the ImFb group compared to the NoFb (ES=1.02-1.25), AvgFb (ES=0.78-0.82) and ViFb (ES=0.74-1.60), respectively. However, LV-JS measures were reduced with moderate to large effects 10 days post-retention for the ViFb (ES=-0.60) and NoFb (ES=-0.85) groups. Providing LV-JS feedback following each jump appears to optimize performance and should be considered as a training tool during VBT.

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