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Analyst. 2018 Mar 12;143(6):1426-1433. doi: 10.1039/c7an02047c.

Practical immune-barometer sensor for trivalent chromium ion detection using gold core platinum shell nanoparticle probes.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, Guangdong Province Engineering Research Center for antibody drug and immunoassay, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, PR China. tyjaq7926@163.com.

Abstract

The technology progress of biosensors has markedly improved healthcare, disease diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food safety control over the past few decades. However, development of sensitive, robust, low-cost and portable assays for on-site bioanalysis is still a great challenge. In this study, we described a portable, feasible and miniaturized immune-barometer sensor (IBS), which can be used to sensitively measure the changes in a pressure signal, and we applied this IBS in the detection of Cr(iii). In this system, a competitive immunoassay was incorporated as a signaling technique for Cr(iii) detection. To generate a signal of pressure changes (ΔP), Au@PtNPs (gold core platinum shell nanoparticles) were prepared for decomposing H2O2 to generate O2 in a sealed chamber. The expansion of gas volume was accurately detected using a sensitive barometer in the sealed reaction chamber. The ΔP correlated well with Cr(iii) concentrations ranging from 0.39 to 25 ng mL-1. The limit of detection (LOD) of the IBS was estimated to be as low as 0.35 ng mL-1. Furthermore, the IBS has high specificity and high recovery for Cr(iii) detection in tap water samples (97.5%-108.7%) and in the Pearl River water samples (95.6%-110.2%). Compared with the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the IBS was observed to be more sensitive, of low-cost and portable for the on-site detection of Cr(iii). Therefore, the IBS is a promising potential method for the detection of heavy metals in aqueous solutions and many other fields.

PMID:
29460929
DOI:
10.1039/c7an02047c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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