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J Res Adolesc. 2018 Mar;28(1):121-133. doi: 10.1111/jora.12334.

Dyadic Neural Similarity During Stress in Mother-Child Dyads.

Author information

1
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
2
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Stanford University.

Abstract

Shared psychological processes between individuals occur most between a mother and her child because the mother-child bond is one of the closest forms of human attachment, in which a mother and her child are essentially wired to connect. We recruited mother-child pairs (Ndyad  = 19; adolescent: Mage  = 13.74, 11 males; mothers: Mage  = 44.26), who each completed an fMRI scan. We examined dyadic neural representational similarity as adolescents completed a stress task and mothers observed their child's performance during the same task. On average, mothers and their children did not show similar neural patterns during stress. However, neural similarity varied depending on family connectedness, such that only dyads reporting high family connectedness showed similar neural profiles. Importantly, increased neural similarity was associated with reduced stress in youth, suggesting that shared neural profiles in mother-child dyads enhance adolescents' psychological well-being.

PMID:
29460351
PMCID:
PMC6402773
DOI:
10.1111/jora.12334
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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