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J Plant Res. 2018 Jul;131(4):709-717. doi: 10.1007/s10265-018-1017-x. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Collaborative environmental DNA sampling from petal surfaces of flowering cherry Cerasus × yedoensis 'Somei-yoshino' across the Japanese archipelago.

Author information

1
Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS), Joint Support-Center for Data Science Research, Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS), Mishima, Shizuoka, 411-8540, Japan. t.ohta@dbcls.rois.ac.jp.
2
National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka, 411-8540, Japan.
3
Division of Biomedical Information Analysis, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8573, Japan.
4
Pathology Project for Molecular Targets, The Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Koto, Tokyo, 135-8550, Japan.
5
Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8568, Japan.
6
Geomicrobiology Group, Kochi Institute for Core Sample Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Nankoku, Kochi, 783-8502, Japan.
7
Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-0845, Japan.
8
Center for Environmental Biology and Ecosystem Studies, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8506, Japan.
9
Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS), Joint Support-Center for Data Science Research, Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS), Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-0871, Japan.
10
Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0032, Japan.
11
Division of Life Science and Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University (TDU), Hiki-gun, Saitama, 350-0394, Japan.
12
Computational Bio-Big Data Open Innovation Lab., National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 169-0072, Japan.
13
Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8568, Japan.
14
Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-0072, Japan.
15
Institute of Health Sciences, Ezaki Glico Co. Ltd., Nishiyodogawa, Osaka, 555-8502, Japan.
16
Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 252-0882, Japan.
17
Department of Physics, Chuo University, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 112-8551, Japan.
18
Faculty of Informatics, Kansai University, Takatsuki, Osaka, 569-1052, Japan.
19
Department of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0032, Japan.
20
Advanced Microbiological Functions Research Group, Frontier Research Labs, Institute For Innovation, Ajinomoto Co., Inc., Kawasaki, Kanagawa, 210-8681, Japan.
21
Japan Software Management Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa, 221-0056, Japan.
22
Division of Biomedical Information Analysis, Department of Integrative Genomics, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8573, Japan.
23
Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, 997-0052, Japan.

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that environmental DNA is found almost everywhere. Flower petal surfaces are an attractive tissue to use for investigation of the dispersal of environmental DNA in nature as they are isolated from the external environment until the bud opens and only then can the petal surface accumulate environmental DNA. Here, we performed a crowdsourced experiment, the "Ohanami Project", to obtain environmental DNA samples from petal surfaces of Cerasus × yedoensis 'Somei-yoshino' across the Japanese archipelago during spring 2015. C. × yedoensis is the most popular garden cherry species in Japan and clones of this cultivar bloom simultaneously every spring. Data collection spanned almost every prefecture and totaled 577 DNA samples from 149 collaborators. Preliminary amplicon-sequencing analysis showed the rapid attachment of environmental DNA onto the petal surfaces. Notably, we found DNA of other common plant species in samples obtained from a wide distribution; this DNA likely originated from the pollen of the Japanese cedar. Our analysis supports our belief that petal surfaces after blossoming are a promising target to reveal the dynamics of environmental DNA in nature. The success of our experiment also shows that crowdsourced environmental DNA analyses have considerable value in ecological studies.

KEYWORDS:

Amplicon sequencing; Cherry blossom; Crowdsourcing; Environmental DNA

PMID:
29460198
DOI:
10.1007/s10265-018-1017-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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