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Nat Genet. 2018 Mar;50(3):362-367. doi: 10.1038/s41588-018-0056-5. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for cattle stature identifies common genes that regulate body size in mammals.

Author information

1
Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen UR Livestock Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
2
AgriBio, Centre for AgriBioscience, Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.
3
School of Applied Systems Biology, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.
4
Faculty of Land and Food Resources, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
5
Centre for Genetic Improvement of Livestock, Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
6
The Semex Alliance, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
7
Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
8
GABI, INRA, AgroParisTech, Université Paris Saclay, Jouy-en-Josas, France.
9
Section for Molecular Genetics and Systems Biology. Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Tjele, Denmark.
10
Platform of Bioinformatics and Statistics, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
11
Chair of Animal Breeding, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
12
Animal Genomics, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
13
GenPhySE, Université de Toulouse, INRA, INPT, INP-ENVT, Castanet-Tolosan, France.
14
Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
15
Green Technology, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Jokioinen, Finland.
16
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
17
Division of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.
18
University of Queensland, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
19
University of Queensland, Queensland Brain Institute, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
20
Qualitas AG, Zug, Switzerland.
21
Allice, Paris, France.
22
Institute of Genetics, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
23
Canadian Beef Breeds Council, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
24
Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Frick, Switzerland.
25
Animal & Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc, Moorepark, Ireland.
26
Institute of Animal Breeding, Bavarian State Research Centre for Agriculture, Poing, Germany.
27
Tierzuchtforschung, Poing, Germany.
28
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
29
Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD, USA.
30
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science/Livestock Gentec, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
31
AgriBio, Centre for AgriBioscience, Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia. b.hayes@uq.edu.au.
32
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Centre for Animal Science, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia. b.hayes@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

Stature is affected by many polymorphisms of small effect in humans 1 . In contrast, variation in dogs, even within breeds, has been suggested to be largely due to variants in a small number of genes2,3. Here we use data from cattle to compare the genetic architecture of stature to those in humans and dogs. We conducted a meta-analysis for stature using 58,265 cattle from 17 populations with 25.4 million imputed whole-genome sequence variants. Results showed that the genetic architecture of stature in cattle is similar to that in humans, as the lead variants in 163 significantly associated genomic regions (P < 5 × 10-8) explained at most 13.8% of the phenotypic variance. Most of these variants were noncoding, including variants that were also expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and in ChIP-seq peaks. There was significant overlap in loci for stature with humans and dogs, suggesting that a set of common genes regulates body size in mammals.

PMID:
29459679
DOI:
10.1038/s41588-018-0056-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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