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Complement Ther Med. 2018 Feb;36:147-153. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2017.12.001. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

A bicentric controlled study on the effects of aquatic Ai Chi in Parkinson disease.

Author information

1
Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, University of Almería, Spain. Electronic address: spd205@ual.es.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Various exercise strategies have been suggested to address movement deficits in order to improve motor function and quality of life for individuals in the early or moderate stages of Parkinson disease. The purpose is to evaluate the effects of an aquatic Ai Chi intervention on balance, gait speed and quality of life of patients.

DESIGN AND INTERVENTION:

Twenty-nine people with Parkinson disease participated in this pilot study. People were randomized into (1) aquatic Ai Chi program (experimental group) and (2) a dry land conventional Western physical therapy intervention (control group). Twenty-two twice-weekly sessions were performed with the 14 patients assigned to the experimental group, during the same period of time as the control group (same number of sessions), who received dry land therapy.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES:

Visual Analogue scale (VAS), The Timed Get up and Go test, Five Times Sit-to-Stand test, single leg standing, Yesavage test and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). A descriptive analysis was performed on all study variables.

RESULTS:

The results showed a significant effect on time - of a high effect which indicates that the VAS scores (F 1.3; p < 0.001), Five time (F = 1.8; p = 0.001) and Get up and Go (F = 1.7; p < 0.001) significantly decreased in time, independent of the treatment group. In contrast, no significant differences were found in the results shown on the PDQ-39 scale, finding only changes in the section of social support (p < 0.001 F = 18.63).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this 11-week controlled pilot trial suggest that aquatic Ai Chi applied twice weekly may potentially reduce Parkinsonian symptoms as measured on different motor symptoms, bradykinesia and rigidity.

KEYWORDS:

Aquatic therapy; Balance; Parkinson disease

PMID:
29458923
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2017.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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