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Ind Psychiatry J. 2017 Jan-Jun;26(1):34-38. doi: 10.4103/ipj.ipj_26_17.

Lifetime alcohol consumption and severity in alcohol dependence syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Command Hospital (SC), Pune, Maharashtra, India.

Abstract

Introduction:

Alcohol dependence syndrome is a major public health issue globally and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. The total dose of alcohol consumed has been linked to liver diseases, pancreatitis, and other alcohol-related medical consequences. However, this has not been studied in relation to severity of dependence; although it is well known that alcohol causes neuronal damage, which in turn potentiates dependence. Thus, there is a need to study the relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and severity of dependence.

Materials and Methods:

A total of 165 consecutive cases of alcohol dependence syndrome were studied in a General Hospital Psychiatry Unit at a tertiary care hospital. Addiction Severity Index (ASI) was used to evaluate the severity of alcohol dependence, and Life Time Alcohol Consumption (LTAC) was evaluated by taking careful history. Correlation coefficients were calculated between ASI and LTAC. Group differences were analyzed using t-test.

Results:

There was a significant correlation between ASI and LTAC (r = 0.162, P = 0.032), which was highly significant in the subgroup without medical complications (r = 0.250, P = 0.003). A similar correlation in the medical complications subgroup was not significant.

Conclusions:

Lifetime alcohol consumption co-related with the severity of alcohol dependence, particularly in those presenting without medical complications (i.e., those with behavioral and social consequences, and injuries).

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; dependence; lifetime consumption; severity

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