Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Biol. 2018 Mar 5;28(5):676-685.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.01.038. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Visual Selective Attention in Mice.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-4435, USA.
2
Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-4435, USA. Electronic address: richard.krauzlis@nih.gov.

Abstract

Visual selective attention is a fundamental cognitive ability that allows us to process relevant visual stimuli while ignoring irrelevant distracters and has been extensively studied in human and non-human primate subjects. Mice have emerged as a powerful animal model for studying aspects of the visual system but have not yet been shown to exhibit visual selective attention. Differences in the organization of the visual systems of primates and mice raise the possibility that selective visual attention might not be present in mice, at least not in the forms that are well established in primates. Here, we tested for selective visual attention in mice by using three behavioral paradigms adapted from classic studies of attention. In a Posner-style cueing task, a spatial cue indicated the probable location of the relevant visual event, and we found that accuracy was higher and reaction times were shorter on validly cued trials. In a cue versus no-cue task, an informative spatial cue was provided on half the trials, and mice had higher accuracy and shorter reaction times with spatial cues and also lower detection thresholds measured from psychometric curves. In a filter task, the spatial cue indicated the location of the relevant visual event, and we found that mice could be trained to ignore irrelevant but otherwise identical visual events at uncued locations. Together, these results demonstrate that mice exhibit visual selective attention, paving the way to use classic attention paradigms in mice to study the genetic and neuronal circuit mechanisms of selective attention.

KEYWORDS:

attention; detection; mice; mouse; perception; psychophysics; visual

PMID:
29456140
PMCID:
PMC5914527
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2018.01.038
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center