Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can J Cardiol. 2018 Apr;34(4):429-436. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2017.11.022. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Sex Differences in Atrial Fibrillation.

Author information

1
Montreal Heart Institute, Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Heart Rhythm Services, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address: Jason.andrade@vch.ca.
2
Heart Rhythm Services, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
3
Montreal Heart Institute, Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a chronic progressive disease characterized by exacerbations and remissions. It remains the most common sustained arrhythmia seen in clinical practice, and represents a major burden to health care systems. Similar to other cardiovascular conditions, significant sex-specific differences have been observed in the epidemiology (lower rate of prevalence in women, women present at a later age), pathophysiology (sex-related differences in AF triggers and substrate), clinical presentation (women are more likely symptomatic, with relatively more severe symptoms), and natural history. Moreover, similar to other cardiovascular conditions there are substantial sex-specific differences in the management of AF, with women being significantly less likely to receive therapeutic anticoagulation, attempts at rhythm control, or undergo invasive cardiovascular procedures. The purpose of this review is to explore these sex-specific differences.

PMID:
29455950
DOI:
10.1016/j.cjca.2017.11.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center