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J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2018 Feb 27:1-5. doi: 10.1080/14767058.2018.1443069. [Epub ahead of print]

Vaginal birth after a cesarean delivery for arrest of descent.

Author information

1
a Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , NY , USA.
2
b Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates , PLLC , New York , NY , USA.
3
c Georgetown University School of Medicine , Washington , DC , USA.
4
d Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine , New York , NY , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study is to determine vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) success rates for patients with a prior cesarean delivery (CD) for arrest of descent, as well as determine any predictors for success.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients delivered by a single MFM practice from 2005 to 2017 with a singleton pregnancy and one prior CD for arrest of descent. We estimated the rate and associated risk factors for successful VBAC.

RESULTS:

We included 208 patients with one prior CD for arrest of descent, 100 (48.1%) of whom attempted a trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) with a VBAC success rate was 84/100 (84%, 95% CI 76-90%). Among the women who attempted TOLAC, women with a prior vaginal delivery >24 weeks' had a significantly higher VBAC success rate (91.8% versus 71.8%, pā€‰=ā€‰.01). Maternal age, body mass index, estimated fetal weight, induction of labor, and cervical dilation were not associated with a higher VBAC success rate.

CONCLUSIONS:

For women with a prior CD for arrest of descent, VBAC success rates are high. This suggests that arrest of descent is mostly dependent on factors unique to each pregnancy and not due to an inadequate pelvis or recurring conditions. Women with a prior CD for arrest of descent should not be discouraged from attempting TOLAC in a subsequent pregnancy due to concerns about the likelihood of success.

KEYWORDS:

Arrest of descent; success; vaginal birth after cesarean

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