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Nat Commun. 2018 Feb 16;9(1):701. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03147-6.

Host defense against oral microbiota by bone-damaging T cells.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0033, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Biomedical Sciences Major, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3, Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima, 734-8553, Japan.
3
Research Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2669, Noda, Chiba, 278-0022, Japan.
4
Department of Cell Signaling, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8549, Japan.
5
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8549, Japan.
6
Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (AMED-CREST), Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8549, Japan.
7
Department of Osteoimmunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0033, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0033, Tokyo, Japan. takayana@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

Abstract

The immune system evolved to efficiently eradicate invading bacteria and terminate inflammation through balancing inflammatory and regulatory T-cell responses. In autoimmune arthritis, pathogenic TH17 cells induce bone destruction and autoimmune inflammation. However, whether a beneficial function of T-cell-induced bone damage exists is unclear. Here, we show that bone-damaging T cells have a critical function in the eradication of bacteria in a mouse model of periodontitis, which is the most common infectious disease. Bacterial invasion leads to the generation of specialized TH17 cells that protect against bacteria by evoking mucosal immune responses as well as inducing bone damage, the latter of which also inhibits infection by removing the tooth. Thus, bone-damaging T cells, which may have developed to stop local infection by inducing tooth loss, function as a double-edged sword by protecting against pathogens while also inducing skeletal tissue degradation.

PMID:
29453398
PMCID:
PMC5816021
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-03147-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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