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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2018 Nov - Dec;6(6):1936-1941.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2018.02.001. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

Association Between Obesity and Acute Severity Among Patients Hospitalized for Asthma Exacerbation.

Author information

1
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Mass; Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: sluthe@hsph.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass.
3
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Mass; Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although studies have demonstrated relations between obesity and incident asthma, little is known about the association of obesity with acute severity in adults hospitalized for asthma exacerbation.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the association of obesity with acute severity of asthma exacerbation.

METHODS:

This is a retrospective cohort study using population-based data of 8 geographically diverse US states from 2010 through 2013. We included adults (age 18-54 years) hospitalized for asthma exacerbation. The outcome measures were markers of acute severity-use of mechanical ventilation (defined by noninvasive positive pressure ventilation and/or invasive mechanical ventilation) and hospital length of stay. To determine the association of obesity with each outcome, we fit multivariable models adjusting for patient-level confounders (eg, age, sex, race/ethnicity, primary insurance, quartiles for household income, residential status, and comorbidities) and potential patient clustering within hospitals.

RESULTS:

Among the 72,086 patients hospitalized for asthma exacerbation, 24% were obese. Obesity was associated with a significantly higher risk of any mechanical ventilation use (8.3% vs 5.0%; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.77; 95% CI, 1.63-1.92; P < .001) driven by the higher risk of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation use (7.2% vs 3.4%; adjusted OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.96-2.35; P < .001). Likewise, obese patients were more likely to have a hospital length of stay of 3 or more days compared with nonobese patients (59.4% vs 46.5%; adjusted OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.32-1.43; P < .001). These findings were consistent with stratifications by age, sex, and race/ethnicity.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this population-based study of adults hospitalized for asthma exacerbation, obesity was associated with higher acute severity.

KEYWORDS:

Acute severity; Adults; Asthma; Hospitalization; Obesity

PMID:
29452277
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2018.02.001

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