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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2018 Apr;87:118-132. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.02.004. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

Serotonergic psychedelics and personality: A systematic review of contemporary research.

Author information

1
International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research and Services (ICEERS), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: jcbouso@iceers.org.
2
International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research and Services (ICEERS), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Neurosciences and Behavior, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; National Institute of Science and Technology - Translational Medicine, Brazil.
3
Departamento de Psicología Biológica y de la Salud. Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
4
Department of Neurosciences and Behavior, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil; National Institute of Science and Technology - Translational Medicine, Brazil.

Abstract

Serotonergic psychedelics act as agonists at cortical 5-HT2A receptors and seem to induce personality changes. We conducted a systematic review of studies assessing the effects of these drugs on personality. Papers published from 1985-2016 were included from PubMed, LILACS, and SciELO databases. Three hundred and sixty-nine studies were identified, and 18 were included. Specific personality traits, such as Absorption and Self-Transcendence, seem to influence the effects of psychedelics, and psychedelic drug users and nonusers appear to differ in some personality traits. Psychedelics administered in controlled settings may induce personality changes, such as increased Openness and Self-Transcendence. Increases in global brain entropy induced by acute psychedelic administration predicted changes in Openness, and Self-Transcendence was negatively correlated with cortical thinning of the posterior cingulate cortex in long-term religious ayahuasca users. Acute and long-term use of psychedelics is associated with personality changes that appear to be modulated by 5-HT2A receptors. These changes seem to induce therapeutic effects that should be further explored in randomized controlled studies.

KEYWORDS:

5-HT(2A) receptor; Hallucinogens; Personality; Psychedelics; Serotonin

PMID:
29452127
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.02.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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