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Pain Manag. 2018 Mar;8(2):129-138. doi: 10.2217/pmt-2017-0051. Epub 2018 Feb 16.

Perceived injustice in chronic pain: an examination through the lens of predictive processing.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98105, USA.

Abstract

Chronic pain conditions have been shown to be exacerbated by psychological factors, and a better understanding of these factors can inform clinical practice and improve the efficacy of interventions. The current paper investigates perceived injustice, a novel psychosocial construct, within a framework influenced by the tenets of predictive processing. The proposed conceptual model derived from tenets of predictive processing yields a single hierarchical self-reconfiguring system driven by prediction, which accounts for a wide range of human experiences such as perception, behavior, learning and emotion. This conceptualization can inform the development and implementation of more targeted therapeutic interventions for chronic pain.

KEYWORDS:

chronic pain; expectancies; goal-oriented behavior; perceived injustice; predictive processing; psychological factors

PMID:
29451429
PMCID:
PMC6123883
DOI:
10.2217/pmt-2017-0051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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