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Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 Feb;30(2):171-175. doi: 10.1017/S1041610218000042.

Dementia clinical trial implications of mild behavioral impairment.

Author information

1
Centre for Research on Ageing,Health and Wellbeing,Research School of Population Health,The Australian National University,Canberra,Australia.
2
Department of Medicine (Neurology),Hurvitz Brain Sciences Research Program,Sunnybrook Research Institute,Sunnybrook HSC,University of Toronto,Toronto,Canada.
3
McGill Center for Studies in Aging,Douglas Mental Health Research Institute,Montreal,Canada.
4
Bracket Global,Wayne,Pennsylvania,USA.
5
Alzheimer's Disease Care,Research and Education Program (AD-CARE),University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry,Rochester,New York,USA.
6
Department of Clinical Neurosciences,Ron and Rene Ward Centre for Healthy Brain Aging,Hotchkiss Brain Institute,University of Calgary,Calgary,Canada.

Abstract

The World Alzheimer Report 2016 estimated that 47 million people are living with dementia worldwide (Alzheimer's Disease International, 2016). In the inaugural World Health Organization Ministerial Conference on Global Action against Dementia, six of the top ten research priorities were focused on prevention, identification, and reduction of dementia risk, and on delivery and quality of care for people with dementia and their carers (Shah et al., 2016). While the Lancet Neurology Commission has suggested that even minor advances to delay progression or ameliorate symptoms might have substantial financial and societal benefits (Winblad et al., 2016), advances have been slow.

PMID:
29448970
DOI:
10.1017/S1041610218000042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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