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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2018 Mar 4;497(2):591-596. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2018.02.109. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

A set of 14 DIP-SNP markers to detect unbalanced DNA mixtures.

Author information

1
The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanxi Medicine University, Taiyuan 030001, Shanxi, China.
2
School of Forensic Medicine, Shanxi Medicine University, Taiyuan 030001, Shanxi, China.
3
School of Forensic Medicine, Shanxi Medicine University, Taiyuan 030001, Shanxi, China. Electronic address: zgengqian@163.com.
4
Department of Forensic Science, North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000, Sichuan, China. Electronic address: dbing04@163.com.

Abstract

Unbalanced DNA mixture is still a difficult problem for forensic practice. DIP-STRs are useful markers for detection of minor DNA but they are not widespread in the human genome and having long amplicons. In this study, we proposed a novel type of genetic marker, termed DIP-SNP. DIP-SNP refers to the combination of INDEL and SNP in less than 300bp length of human genome. The multiplex PCR and SNaPshot assay were established for 14 DIP-SNP markers in a Chinese Han population from Shanxi, China. This novel compound marker allows detection of the minor DNA contributor with sensitivity from 1:50 to 1:1000 in a DNA mixture of any gender with 1 ng-10 ng DNA template. Most of the DIP-SNP markers had a relatively high probability of informative alleles with an average I value of 0.33. In all, we proposed DIP-SNP as a novel kind of genetic marker for detection of minor contributor from unbalanced DNA mixture and established the detection method by associating the multiplex PCR and SNaPshot assay. DIP-SNP polymorphisms are promising markers for forensic or clinical mixture examination because they are shorter, widespread and higher sensitive.

KEYWORDS:

DIP-SNP; Genetic polymorphism; Shanxi; Unbalanced mixture DNA

PMID:
29448110
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2018.02.109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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