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Gynecol Endocrinol. 2018 Aug;34(8):659-663. doi: 10.1080/09513590.2017.1423466. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

High dose vitamin D supplementation can improve menstrual problems, dysmenorrhea, and premenstrual syndrome in adolescents.

Author information

1
a Student Research Committee , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
2
b Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies, Faculty of Medicine , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
3
c Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
4
d Pharmacological Research Center of Medicinal Plants, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
5
e Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Health , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
6
f Clinical Research Unit , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
7
g Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Medicine , Arak University of Medical Sciences , Arak , Iran.
8
h Department of Nutrition, School of Medicine , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.
9
i Division of Medical Education , Brighton & Sussex Medical School , Brighton , UK.
10
j Complementary and Chinese Medicine, Persian and Complementary Medicine Faculty , Mashhad University of Medical Sciences , Mashhad , Iran.

Abstract

Vitamin D has a crucial role in female reproduction, possibly through its effects on calcium homeostasis, cyclic sex steroid hormone fluctuations, or neurotransmitter function. We have assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation on dysmenorrhea and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in adolescents. In this study, 897 adolescent girls living in Mashhad and Sabzevar, Iran, received nine high-dose vitamin D supplements (as 50,000 IU/week of cholecalciferol) and were followed up over 9 weeks. We evaluated the effect of vitamin D supplementation on individuals in four categories: those with only PMS; individuals with only dysmenorrhea; subjects with both PMS and dysmenorrhea and normal subjects. The prevalence of PMS after the intervention fell from 14.9% to 4.8% (p < .001). Similar results were also found for the prevalence of subjects with dysmenorrhea (35.9% reduced to 32.4%), and in subjects with both PMS and dysmenorrhea (32.7% reduced 25.7%). Vitamin D supplementation was associated with a reduction in the incidence of several symptoms of PMS such as backache and tendency to cry easily as well as decrement in pain severity of dysmenorrhea (p < .05). High dose vitamin D supplementation can reduce the prevalence of PMS and dysmenorrhea as well as has positive effects on the physical and psychological symptoms of PMS.

KEYWORDS:

Vitamin D supplementation; dysmenorrhea; menstrual cycle; premenstrual syndrome

PMID:
29447494
DOI:
10.1080/09513590.2017.1423466
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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