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Cell Rep. 2018 Feb 13;22(7):1681-1694. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2018.01.059.

Nuclear Organization in the Spinal Cord Depends on Motor Neuron Lamination Orchestrated by Catenin and Afadin Function.

Author information

1
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), 13125 Berlin, Germany; Cluster of Excellence NeuroCure, Neuroscience Research Center, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
2
Cluster of Excellence NeuroCure, Neuroscience Research Center, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany; Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology, 13125 Berlin, Germany.
3
Department of Neuroscience , Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Biochemistry , Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute , Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
4
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), 13125 Berlin, Germany; Cluster of Excellence NeuroCure, Neuroscience Research Center, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: niccolo.zampieri@mdc-berlin.de.

Abstract

Motor neurons in the spinal cord are found grouped in nuclear structures termed pools, whose position is precisely orchestrated during development. Despite the emerging role of pool organization in the assembly of spinal circuits, little is known about the morphogenetic programs underlying the patterning of motor neuron subtypes. We applied three-dimensional analysis of motor neuron position to reveal the roles and contributions of cell adhesive function by inactivating N-cadherin, catenin, and afadin signaling. Our findings reveal that nuclear organization of motor neurons is dependent on inside-out positioning, orchestrated by N-cadherin, catenin, and afadin activities, controlling cell body layering on the medio-lateral axis. In addition to this lamination-like program, motor neurons undergo a secondary, independent phase of organization. This process results in segregation of motor neurons along the dorso-ventral axis of the spinal cord, does not require N-cadherin or afadin activity, and can proceed even when medio-lateral positioning is perturbed.

KEYWORDS:

N-cadherin; afadin; migration; motor neuron; motor pool; nectins; spinal cord; β-catenin

PMID:
29444423
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2018.01.059
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