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Neurol Clin Pract. 2014 Oct;4(5):410-418. doi: 10.1212/CPJ.0000000000000028.

Isolated vestibular syndrome in posterior circulation stroke: Frequency and involved structures.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology (J-HC), Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute; Departments of Neurology (H-WK, K-DC, M-JK, YRC, H-JC, S-MS, D-SJ) and Radiology (H-JK), Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute; and Department of Neurology (J-SK), Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, South Korea.

Abstract

Dizziness/vertigo is a common symptom of posterior circulation stroke and usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs. Although strokes involving the brainstem or cerebellum may produce isolated vestibular syndrome (isolated vertigo or imbalance), the overall frequency and involved structures of isolated vestibular syndrome in the posterior circulation stroke remain uncertain. Isolated vestibular syndrome occurs in approximately 25% of the patients with posterior circulation stroke, and mostly involves the cerebellum, inferior or superior cerebellar peduncles, and caudal lateral or rostral dorsolateral medulla. The occasional negative neuroimaging in patients with acute isolated vascular vertigo highlights the importance of appropriate bedside evaluation in acute vestibular syndrome.

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