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Curr Environ Health Rep. 2018 Mar;5(1):88-99. doi: 10.1007/s40572-018-0180-5.

Cumulative Risk and Impact Modeling on Environmental Chemical and Social Stressors.

Author information

1
Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Hongtai.Huang@ucsf.edu.
2
Institute for Computational Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Hongtai.Huang@ucsf.edu.
3
Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
4
Institute for Computational Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
5
Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, and the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The goal of this review is to identify cumulative modeling methods used to evaluate combined effects of exposures to environmental chemicals and social stressors. The specific review question is: What are the existing quantitative methods used to examine the cumulative impacts of exposures to environmental chemical and social stressors on health?

RECENT FINDINGS:

There has been an increase in literature that evaluates combined effects of exposures to environmental chemicals and social stressors on health using regression models; very few studies applied other data mining and machine learning techniques to this problem. The majority of studies we identified used regression models to evaluate combined effects of multiple environmental and social stressors. With proper study design and appropriate modeling assumptions, additional data mining methods may be useful to examine combined effects of environmental and social stressors.

KEYWORDS:

Combined effects; Cumulative risk; Environmental stressors; Non-chemical stressors; Quantitative modeling; Social stressors

PMID:
29441463
PMCID:
PMC5876145
[Available on 2019-03-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s40572-018-0180-5

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