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Thorax. 2018 Nov;73(11):1071-1074. doi: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-211208. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

Association between acute respiratory disease events and the MUC5B promoter polymorphism in smokers.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Department of Radiology, Laboratory of Mathematics in Imaging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Weil Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, Marisco Lung Institute, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
9
Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
10
Department of Radiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

A single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs35705950) in the mucin 5B (MUC5B) gene promoter is associated with pulmonary fibrosis and interstitial features on chest CT but may also have beneficial effects. In non-Hispanic whites in the COPDGene cohort with interstitial features (n=454), the MUC5B promoter polymorphism was associated with a 61% lower odds of a prospectively reported acute respiratory disease event (P=0.001), a longer time-to-first event (HR=0.57; P=0.006) and 40% fewer events (P=0.016). The MUC5B promoter polymorphism may have a beneficial effect on the risk of acute respiratory disease events in smokers with interstitial CT features.

KEYWORDS:

copd exacerbations; idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; interstitial fibrosis

PMID:
29440587
PMCID:
PMC6089672
[Available on 2019-11-01]
DOI:
10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-211208

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