Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Pediatr. 2018 Feb 13;18(1):58. doi: 10.1186/s12887-018-1059-1.

Elevated central venous pressure is associated with increased mortality in pediatric septic shock patients.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-2 dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736, Republic of Korea.
2
Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-2 dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736, Republic of Korea. goodjobman79@naver.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Central venous pressure (CVP) is an important factor affecting capillary blood flow, and it is associated with poor outcomes in adult septic shock patients. However, whether a similar association exists in pediatric patients remains unclear.

METHODS:

We retrospectively analyzed data from patients admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2009 and July 2015. Patients were divided into two groups-survivors and nonsurvivors-according to 28-day mortality. The associations between (a) mortality and CVP at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after initiating treatment for established septic shock was analyzed and (b) initial serum lactic acid levels and 6-h CVP.

RESULTS:

Two hundred twenty-six patients were included in this study, and the mortality rate was 29.6% (67 deaths, nonsurvivor group). Initial serum lactic acid levels, Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) III score, and Vasoactive-Inotropic Score (VIS) within 24 h after PICU admission were significantly higher in the nonsurvivors than in survivors (1.3 [0.9, 2.4] vs. 3.9 [1.6, 8.0] mmol/l, 11.0 [7.0, 15.0] vs. 17.0 [10.0, 21.5], 12.0 [7.0, 25.0] vs. 22.5 [8.0, 55.0], respectively with p-values < 0.001, < 0.001, and 0.009, respectively). In addition, compared to survivors, a greater percentage of nonsurvivors required mechanical ventilation (92.5% vs. 51.6%, p <  0.001) and showed a greater extent of fluid overload at 48 h after admission (3.9% vs. 1.9%, p = 0.006), along with higher 6-h CVP (10.0 [7.0, 16.0] vs. 8.0 [5.0, 11.0] mmHg, p <  0.001). Patient survival according to levels of CVP (CVP < 8 mmHg, CVP 8-12 mmHg, or CVP > 12 mmHg) showed that the CVP > 12-mmHg group had significantly greater mortality rates (50.0%, p = 0.002) than the other groups (21.3% and 27.5%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis identified significant associations of CVP > 12 mmHg, serum lactic acid levels, and the need for mechanical ventilation with mortality (OR: 2.74, 1.30, and 12.51, respectively; 95% CI: 1.11-6.72, 1.12-1.50, and 4.12-37.96, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Elevated CVP is an independent risk factor for mortality in pediatric septic shock patients.

KEYWORDS:

Central venous pressure; Mortality; Pediatrics; Septic shock

PMID:
29439683
PMCID:
PMC5811958
DOI:
10.1186/s12887-018-1059-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center